Articles | Volume 12, issue 1
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 12, 591–609, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-591-2020
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 12, 591–609, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-591-2020

Data description paper 17 Mar 2020

Data description paper | 17 Mar 2020

Marine carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2): a compilation of measurements in seawater and the marine boundary layer

Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.

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Latest update: 27 Jan 2021
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Short summary
Sulfur-containing trace gases in the atmosphere influence atmospheric chemistry and the energy budget of the Earth by forming aerosols. The ocean is an important source of the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere, carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and its most important precursor carbon disulfide (CS2). In order to assess global variability of the sea surface concentrations of both gases to calculate their oceanic emissions, we have compiled a database of existing shipborne measurements.