Articles | Volume 14, issue 8
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 14, 3573–3598, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-14-3573-2022
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 14, 3573–3598, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-14-3573-2022
Data description paper
10 Aug 2022
Data description paper | 10 Aug 2022

Elevation change of the Antarctic Ice Sheet: 1985 to 2020

Johan Nilsson et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Veit Helm, 13 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Johan Nilsson on behalf of the Authors (14 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Feb 2022) by Ge Peng
RR by Veit Helm (18 Mar 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Mar 2022) by Ge Peng
AR by Johan Nilsson on behalf of the Authors (28 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (02 Apr 2022) by Ge Peng
AR by Johan Nilsson on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Johan Nilsson on behalf of the Authors (02 Jun 2022)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (04 Jun 2022) by Ge Peng
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Short summary
The longest observational record available to study the mass balance of the Earth’s ice sheets comes from satellite altimeters. This record consists of multiple satellite missions with different measurements and quality, and it must be cross-calibrated and integrated into a consistent record for scientific use. Here, we present a novel approach for generating such a record providing a seamless record of elevation change for the Antarctic Ice Sheet that spans the period 1985 to 2020.