Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 12, 1385–1417, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-1385-2020
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 12, 1385–1417, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-1385-2020

Data description paper 22 Jun 2020

Data description paper | 22 Jun 2020

Description of the multi-approach gravity field models from Swarm GPS data

João Teixeira da Encarnação et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Joao de Teixeira da Encarnacao on behalf of the Authors (28 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Mar 2020) by Kirsten Elger
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Apr 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Apr 2020) by Kirsten Elger
AR by Joao de Teixeira da Encarnacao on behalf of the Authors (18 Apr 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Apr 2020) by Kirsten Elger
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Short summary
Although not the primary mission of the Swarm three-satellite constellation, the sensors on these satellites are accurate enough to measure the melting and accumulation of Earth’s ice reservoirs, precipitation cycles, floods, and droughts, amongst others. Swarm sees these changes well compared to the dedicated GRACE satellites at spatial scales of roughly 1500 km. Swarm confirms most GRACE observations, such as the large ice melting in Greenland and the wet and dry seasons in the Amazon.