Articles | Volume 10, issue 2
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1139–1164, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1139-2018
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1139–1164, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1139-2018

  20 Jun 2018

20 Jun 2018

Central-Pacific surface meteorology from the 2016 El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) field campaign

Leslie M. Hartten et al.

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Latest update: 15 Jun 2021
Short summary
In early 2016 the NOAA's El Niño Rapid Response Field Campaign documented the ongoing strong event and its impacts. Observations from the warmed Pacific included 10 weeks of surface meteorology from Kiritimati Island and 4 weeks of surface meteorology and air–sea fluxes from NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown. We have vetted the data, identifying issues and minimizing their impacts when possible. Measurements include a meter of rain at Kiritimati, and continuous ocean and air conditions from the ship.