Articles | Volume 10, issue 2
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1139–1164, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1139-2018
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1139–1164, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1139-2018

  20 Jun 2018

20 Jun 2018

Central-Pacific surface meteorology from the 2016 El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) field campaign

Leslie M. Hartten et al.

Data sets

El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) Field Campaign: Surface Fluxes from NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown, 2016-02 to 2016-03 (NCEI Accession 0167875) C. Cox and L. Hartten https://doi.org/10.7289/V58050VP

El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) Field Campaign: Surface Meteorological and Ship Data from the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown, February-March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0161528) C. Cox, D. Wolfe, L. Hartten and P. Johnston, P. https://doi.org/10.7289/V5SF2T80

El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) Field Campaign: Surface Meteorological Data from Kiritimati Island, January-March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0161526) L. Hartten, P. Johnston, C. Cox, and D. Wolfe https://doi.org/10.7289/V51Z42H4

Short summary
In early 2016 the NOAA's El Niño Rapid Response Field Campaign documented the ongoing strong event and its impacts. Observations from the warmed Pacific included 10 weeks of surface meteorology from Kiritimati Island and 4 weeks of surface meteorology and air–sea fluxes from NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown. We have vetted the data, identifying issues and minimizing their impacts when possible. Measurements include a meter of rain at Kiritimati, and continuous ocean and air conditions from the ship.