Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-16-2525-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-16-2525-2024
Data description paper
 | 
30 May 2024
Data description paper |  | 30 May 2024

Data collected using small uncrewed aircraft systems during the TRacking Aerosol Convection interactions ExpeRiment (TRACER)

Francesca Lappin, Gijs de Boer, Petra Klein, Jonathan Hamilton, Michelle Spencer, Radiance Calmer, Antonio R. Segales, Michael Rhodes, Tyler M. Bell, Justin Buchli, Kelsey Britt, Elizabeth Asher, Isaac Medina, Brian Butterworth, Leia Otterstatter, Madison Ritsch, Bryony Puxley, Angelina Miller, Arianna Jordan, Ceu Gomez-Faulk, Elizabeth Smith, Steven Borenstein, Troy Thornberry, Brian Argrow, and Elizabeth Pillar-Little

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Short summary
This article provides an overview of the lower-atmospheric dataset collected by two uncrewed aerial systems near the Gulf of Mexico coastline south of Houston, TX, USA, as part of the TRacking Aerosol Convection interactions ExpeRiment (TRACER) campaign. The data were collected through boundary layer transitions, through sea breeze circulations, and in the pre- and near-storm environment to understand how these processes influence the coastal environment.
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