Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 14, 1271–1330, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-14-1271-2022

Special issue: WALIS – the World Atlas of Last Interglacial...

Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 14, 1271–1330, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-14-1271-2022
Review article
22 Mar 2022
Review article | 22 Mar 2022

MIS 5e sea-level history along the Pacific coast of North America

Daniel R. Muhs

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2021-345', Jessica Creveling, 01 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Daniel R Muhs, 26 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2021-345', John Wehmiller, 11 Nov 2021
    • CC2: 'Reply on RC2', Alessio Rovere, 25 Nov 2021
      • RC3: 'Reply on CC2', John Wehmiller, 29 Nov 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Daniel R Muhs, 26 Jan 2022
  • CC1: 'Comment on essd-2021-345', Barbara Mauz, 22 Nov 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on CC1', Daniel R Muhs, 26 Jan 2022
  • RC4: 'Comment on essd-2021-345', Hayley C. Cawthra, 30 Nov 2021
    • AC4: 'Reply on RC4', Daniel R Muhs, 26 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Daniel R Muhs on behalf of the Authors (30 Jan 2022)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (04 Feb 2022) by Colin V. Murray-Wallace
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Short summary
The last interglacial period, known as marine isotope substage (MIS) 5e, was the last time in recent geologic history when sea level was substantially higher than present. It is an important time period to understand because climate models forecast a higher global sea level in the not-too-distant future. Geologic records of this high-sea stand (marine terraces, reefs) along the Pacific coast of North America are reviewed here with the identification of knowledge gaps where more work is needed.