Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2023-185
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2023-185
12 Jun 2023
 | 12 Jun 2023
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal ESSD but the revision was not accepted.

Anthropogenic and ecology research indicators of top commercial fish species in the Baltic Sea: Review

Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson and Giuseppe T. Cirella

Abstract. In many parts of the world, morality caused as a result of fishing actives is the only influencer affecting the status of top commercial stocks. This however is not the case in the Baltic Sea, which has a multitude of other processes that influence fish stock dynamics. This paper compartmentalises 248 publications that consider the cumulative effects and trade-offs some of the biggest anthropogenic and ecology stressors (temperature change, hypoxia, eutrophication, nutrient pollution acidification, low salinity and food-web dynamics) have on the ecology of top commercial fish species in the Baltic Sea (cod, sprat, whiting, herring, flounder and plaice). The results illustrate the extent of academic research that can be applied to commercial fisheries knowledge in the Baltic Sea and identifies which pressures have the greatest negative impacts for which species. In addition, the findings demonstrate how well individual fish stocks have adapted to the changing environmental conditions of the Baltic Sea. In doing so, the review illustrates the next challenges and underlines what fish will likely dominate in the future and which will struggle. With increased natural hazards, top commercial fish species have reacted differently, depending on the region and adaptive capabilities. In most cases, species in the Clupeidae family have adapted the best to their new surroundings, flatfish resilience is varied, whilst fish in the Gadidae family are finding the Baltic Sea too hostile.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson and Giuseppe T. Cirella

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2023-185', Annalisa Minelli, 26 Jul 2023
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson, 02 Aug 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2023-185', Davide Agnetta, 11 Oct 2023
    • CC2: 'Reply on RC2', Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson, 12 Oct 2023
  • AC1: 'Final response on essd-2023-185', Giuseppe T. Cirella, 02 Nov 2023

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2023-185', Annalisa Minelli, 26 Jul 2023
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson, 02 Aug 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2023-185', Davide Agnetta, 11 Oct 2023
    • CC2: 'Reply on RC2', Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson, 12 Oct 2023
  • AC1: 'Final response on essd-2023-185', Giuseppe T. Cirella, 02 Nov 2023
Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson and Giuseppe T. Cirella

Data sets

Dataset_for_anthropogenic_and_ecology_indicators_of_fish_species_in_the_Baltic_Sea Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson and Giuseppe T. Cirella https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.22885913

Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson and Giuseppe T. Cirella

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Short summary
This paper compartmentalises 248 publications that consider the cumulative effects and trade-offs some of the biggest anthropogenic and ecology stressors have on the ecology of top commercial fish species in the Baltic Sea. The results illustrate the extent of academic research that can be applied to commercial fisheries knowledge in the Baltic Sea and identifies which pressures have the greatest negative impacts for which species.
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