Articles | Volume 9, issue 1
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 91–98, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-91-2017

Special issue: Hydrometeorological data from mountain and alpine research...

Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 91–98, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-91-2017

  14 Feb 2017

14 Feb 2017

Meteorological, snow, streamflow, topographic, and vegetation height data from four western juniper-dominated experimental catchments in southwestern Idaho, USA

Patrick R. Kormos1, Danny G. Marks1, Frederick B. Pierson1, C. Jason Williams1, Stuart P. Hardegree1, Alex R. Boehm1, Scott C. Havens1, Andrew Hedrick1, Zane K. Cram1, and Tony J. Svejcar2 Patrick R. Kormos et al.
  • 1Northwest Watershed Research Center, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, 800 Park Blvd, Suite 105, Boise, ID 83712, USA
  • 2Range and Meadow Forage Management Research Unit, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, 67826-A, Highway 205, Burns, OR 97720, USA

Abstract. Meteorological, snow, streamflow, topographic, and vegetation height data are presented from the South Mountain experimental catchments. This study site was established in 2007 as a collaborative, long-term research laboratory to address the impacts of western juniper encroachment and woodland treatments in the interior Great Basin region of the western USA. The data provide detailed information on the weather and hydrologic response from four highly instrumented catchments in the late stages of woodland encroachment in a sagebrush steppe landscape. Hourly data from six meteorologic stations and four weirs have been carefully processed, quality-checked, and are serially complete. These data are ideal for hydrologic, ecosystem, and biogeochemical modeling. Data presented are publicly available from the USDA National Agricultural Library administered by the Agricultural Research Service (https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/data-weather-snow-and-streamflow-data-four-western-juniper-dominated-experimental-catchments, doi:10.15482/USDA.ADC/1254010).

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Short summary
Data are presented that are essential to assessing the impacts of western juniper encroachment and woodland treatments in the interior Great Basin region of the western USA. This woodland expansion into sagebrush ecosystems influences the vegetation community and the hydrology and soil resources of an area, which affect wildlife habitat, ecosystem quality, and local economies. Data include weather, snow, and stream time series, as well as lidar-derived topographic and vegetation height data.