Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-128
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-128
 
19 Apr 2022
19 Apr 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

The biogeography of relative abundance of soil fungi and bacteria in top surface soil

Kailiang Yu1, Johan van den Hoogen1, Zhiqiang Wang2, Colin Averill1, Devin Routh1, Gabriel R. Smith3,1, Rebecca E. Drenovsky4, Kate M. Scow5, Fei Mo6, Mark P. Waldrop7, Yuanhe Yang8,9, Weize Tang9,10, Franciska T. De Vries11, Richard D. Bardgett12, Peter Manning13, Felipe Bastida14, Sara G. Baer15, Elizabeth M. Bach16, Carlos García14, Qingkui Wang17, Linna Ma8, Baodong Chen18,9, Xianjing He19, Sven Teurlincx20, Amber Heijboer21,22, James A. Bradley23,24, and Thomas W. Crowther1 Kailiang Yu et al.
  • 1Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
  • 2Institute for Advanced Study, Chengdu University, Chengdu, China
  • 3Department of Biology, Stanford University, California, USA
  • 4Biology Department, John Carroll University, Ohio, USA
  • 5Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California, USA
  • 6College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, PR China
  • 7U.S. Geological Survey. Geology, Minerals, Energy, and Geophysics Science Center. Menlo Park, California, USA
  • 8State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 9University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 10Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
  • 11Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • 12Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK
  • 13Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt, Germay
  • 14CEBAS-CSIC. Department of Soil and Water Conservation. Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Murcia, Spain
  • 15Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
  • 16The Nature Conservancy, Nachusa Grasslands, Franklin Grove, IL, USA
  • 17Huitong Experimental Station of Forest Ecology, CAS Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Shenyang, PR China
  • 18State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 19Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region’s Eco-Environment, Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China
  • 20Department of Aquatic Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands
  • 21Biometris, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands
  • 22Ecology and Biodiversity Group, Department of Biology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Padualaan, Netherlands
  • 23School of Geography, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS, UK
  • 24Interface Geochemistry, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany

Abstract. Fungi and bacteria are the two dominant groups of soil microbial communities worldwide. By controlling the turnover of soil organic matter, these organisms directly regulate the exchange of carbon between the soil and the atmosphere. Fundamental differences in the physiology and life history of bacteria and fungi suggest that variation in the biogeography of soil fungal and bacterial relative abundance could drive striking differences in carbon decomposition and soil organic matter formation across different biomes. However, a lack of global and predictive information on the distribution of these organisms in terrestrial ecosystems has prevented the inclusion of soil fungal and bacterial relative abundance and the associated processes into global biogeochemical models. Here, we used a global scale dataset in the top soil surface (>3000 distinct observations of soil fungal and bacterial abundance) to generate the first quantitative and spatially high resolution (1 km) explicit map of soil fungal proportion, defined as fungi/fungi + bacteria, across terrestrial ecosystems. We reveal striking latitudinal trends where fungal dominance increases in cold and high latitude environments with large soil carbon stocks. There was strong non-linear response of fungal dominance to environmental gradient, i.e., mean annual temperature (MAT) and net primary productivity (NPP). Fungi and bacteria dominated in regions with low and high MAT and NPP, respectively, thus representing slow vs. fast soil energy channels, a concept with a long history in soil ecology. These high-resolution models provide the first steps towards representing the major soil microbial groups and their functional differences in global biogeochemical models to improve predictions of soil organic matter turnover under current and future climate scenarios. Raw datasets and global maps generated in this study are available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.19556419 (Yu, 2022).

Kailiang Yu et al.

Status: open (until 25 Jun 2022)

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  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2022-128', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 May 2022 reply

Kailiang Yu et al.

Data sets

A global map of relative abundance of soil fungi and bacteria in top surface soil Yu et al. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.19556419.v1

Model code and software

Biogeography-of-soil-microbes Kailiang Yu https://github.com/KailiangYu/Biogeography-of-soil-microbes.git

Kailiang Yu et al.

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Short summary
We used a global scale dataset in the top soil surface (>3000 distinct observations of soil fungal and bacterial abundance) to generate the first quantitative map of soil fungal proportion across terrestrial ecosystems. We reveal striking latitudinal trends. Fungi and bacteria dominated in regions with low and high MAT and NPP, respectively.