Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2021-287
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2021-287
 
21 Oct 2021
21 Oct 2021
Status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ESSD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Elevation Change of the Antarctic Ice Sheet: 1985 to 2020

Johan Nilsson, Alex Gardner, and Fernando Paolo Johan Nilsson et al.
  • Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, 91109, United States

Abstract. The largest uncertainty in future projections of sea level change comes from the uncertain response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to the warming oceans and atmosphere. The ice sheet gains roughly 2000 km3 of ice from precipitation each year and losses a similar amount through solid ice discharge into the surrounding oceans. Numerous studies have shown that the ice sheet is currently out of long-term equilibrium, losing mass at an accelerated rate and increasing sea levels rise. Projections of sea-level change rely on accurate estimates of the contribution of land ice to the contemporary sea level budget. The longest observational record available to study the mass balance of the Earth’s ice sheets comes from satellite altimeters. This record, however, consists of multiple satellite missions with different life-spans, inconsistent measurement types (radar and laser) and of varying quality. To fully utilize these data, measurements from different missions must be cross-calibrated and integrated into a consistent record of change. Here, we present a novel approach for generating such a record. We describe in detail the advanced geophysical corrections applied and the processes needed to derive elevation change estimates. We processed the full archive record of satellite altimetry data, providing a seamless record of elevation change for the Antarctic Ice Sheet that spans the period 1985 to 2020. The data are produced and distributed as part of the NASA MEaSUREs ITS_LIVE project (Nilsson et al., 2021).

Johan Nilsson et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Veit Helm, 13 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Dec 2021

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Veit Helm, 13 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Dec 2021

Johan Nilsson et al.

Data sets

Elevation Change of the Antarctic Ice Sheet: 1985 to 2020 Johan Nilsson, Alex Gardner and Fernando Paolo https://its-live.jpl.nasa.gov/

Johan Nilsson et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 761 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
554 185 22 761 13 19
  • HTML: 554
  • PDF: 185
  • XML: 22
  • Total: 761
  • BibTeX: 13
  • EndNote: 19
Views and downloads (calculated since 21 Oct 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 21 Oct 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 689 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 689 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 17 May 2022
Download
Short summary
The longest observational record available to study the mass balance of the Earth’s ice sheets comes from satellite altimeters. This record consists of multiple satellite missions with different measurements and quality, and must be cross-calibrated and integrated into a consistent record for scientific use. Here, we present a novel approach for generating such a record providing a seamless record of elevation change for the Antarctic Ice Sheet that spans the period 1985 to 2020.