Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-66
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-66
 
18 Feb 2022
18 Feb 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

Mesoscale observations of temperature and salinity in the Arctic Transpolar Drift: a high-resolution dataset from the MOSAiC Distributed Network

Mario Hoppmann1, Ivan Kuznetsov1,, Ying-Chih Fang2,, and Benjamin Rabe1, Mario Hoppmann et al.
  • 1Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven, Germany
  • 2National Sun Yat-sen University University, 80424 Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. Measurements targeting mesoscale and submesoscale processes in the ice-covered part of the Arctic Ocean are sparse in all seasons. As a result, there are significant knowledge gaps with respect to these processes, in particular related to the role of eddies and fronts in the coupled ocean–atmosphere–sea ice system. Here we present a unique observational dataset of upper ocean temperature and salinity collected by a set of buoys installed on ice floes as part of the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) Distributed Network. The multi-sensor systems, each of them equipped with five temperature and salinity recorders on a 100 m long inductive modem tether, drifted together with the main MOSAiC ice camp through the Arctic Transpolar Drift between October 2019 and August 2020. They transmitted hydrographic in situ data via the iridium satellite network at 10 minute intervals. While three buoys failed early due to ice dynamics, five of them recorded data continuously for 10 months. Four units were successfully recovered in early August 2020, additionally yielding internally stored instrument data at 2 minute intervals. The raw datasets (Hoppmann et al., 2021i) were merged, processed, quality-controlled and validated using independent measurements. Upon acceptance of the manuscript, the finally processed dataset (currently under moratorium) will be made publicly available under Hoppmann et al. (2022i). As an important part of the MOSAiC physical oceanography program, this unique dataset has many synergies with the manifold co-located observational datasets, and is expected to yield significant insights into ocean processes, and to contribute to the validation of high-resolution numerical simulations.

Mario Hoppmann et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2022-66', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 May 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2022-66', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 May 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on essd-2022-66', Anonymous Referee #3, 18 May 2022

Mario Hoppmann et al.

Data sets

Raw data of CTD buoys 2019O1 to 2019O8 as part of the MOSAiC Distributed Network Hoppmann, Mario; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Fang, Ying-Chih; Rabe, Benjamin https://www.pangaea.de/tok/88bfe8f850838ba2de6da30302f9079a35723e63

Processed data of CTD buoys 2019O1 to 2019O8 as part of the MOSAiC Distributed Network Hoppmann, Mario; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Fang, Ying-Chih; Rabe, Benjamin https://www.pangaea.de/tok/147f801ef2a96849e4c64c1fd3eedf31aa802c21

Mario Hoppmann et al.

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Short summary
The role of eddies and fronts in the oceans is a hot topic in climate research, but there are still many associated knowledge gaps particularly in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. Here we present a unique dataset of ocean observations collected by a set of drifting buoys installed on ice floes as part of the recent MOSAiC drift experiment. The buoys recorded data continuously for 10 months, providing extraordinary insights into the properties and processes of the ocean along their drift path.