Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-341
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-341
 
28 Oct 2022
28 Oct 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

RC4USCoast: A river chemistry dataset for regional ocean model applications in the U.S. East, Gulf of Mexico, and West Coasts

Fabian A. Gomez1,2, Sang-Ki Lee2, Charles A. Stock3, Andrew C. Ross3, Laure Resplandy4, Samantha A. Siedlecki5, Filippos Tagklis2,6, and Joseph E. Salisbury7 Fabian A. Gomez et al.
  • 1Northern Gulf Institute, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi, USA
  • 2NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, Florida, USA
  • 3NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
  • 4Department of Geosciences, High Meadows Environmental Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
  • 5Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, Groton, Connecticut, USA
  • 6Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA
  • 7Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, USA

Abstract. A historical dataset of river chemistry and discharge is presented for 140 monitoring sites along the United States East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and the West Coast from 1950 to 2020. The dataset, referred to here as River Chemistry for the U.S. Coast (RC4USCoast), is mostly derived from the Water Quality Database of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), but also includes river discharge from the USGS’s Surface-Water Monthly Statistics for the Nation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. RC4USCoast provides monthly time series as well as long-term averaged monthly climatological patterns for twenty variables including alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. It is mainly intended as a data product for regional ocean biogeochemical models and carbon chemistry studies in the U.S. coastal regions. Here we present the method to derive RC4USCoast and briefly describe the river's carbonate chemistry patterns.

Fabian A. Gomez et al.

Status: open (until 23 Dec 2022)

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Fabian A. Gomez et al.

Data sets

RC4USCoast: A river chemistry dataset for regional ocean model application in the U.S. East, Gulf of Mexico, and West Coasts from 1950-01-01 to 2020-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0260455) Gomez, F. A., Lee, S. K., Stock, C. A., Ross, A. C., Resplandy, L., Siedlecki, S. A., Tagklis, F., Salisbury, J. E. https://doi.org/10.25921/9jfw-ph50

Fabian A. Gomez et al.

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Short summary
We present a river chemistry and discharge dataset for 140 rivers in the United States, which integrates information from the Water Quality Database of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the USGS’s Surface-Water Monthly Statistics for the Nation, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This dataset includes dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity, two key properties to characterize the carbonate system, as well as nutrient concentration, such as nitrate and phosphate, and silica.