Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-111
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2022-111
 
11 Apr 2022
11 Apr 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

Sea surface height anomaly and geostrophic current velocity from altimetry measurements over the Arctic Ocean (2011–2020)

Francesca Doglioni1, Robert Ricker1, Benjamin Rabe1, Alexander Barth2, Charles Troupin2, and Torsten Kanzow1,3 Francesca Doglioni et al.
  • 1Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
  • 2GeoHydrodynamics and Environment Research (GHER), University of Liège, Belgium
  • 3Department 1 of Physics and Electrical Engineering, University of Bremen, Germany

Abstract. Satellite altimetry missions flying over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean have been opening the possibility to further understand recent changes in the surface circulation. The use of these data has been however deferred by the need for dedicated processing, with efforts to generate consistent Arctic-wide datasets ongoing. The aim of this paper is to provide and assess a new gridded dataset of sea surface height anomaly and geostrophic velocity, extending over both the ice-covered and open ocean areas of the Arctic. Data from the Cryosat-2 mission in the period 2011–2020 were gridded at one month intervals, up to 88° N, using the Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA) method. To examine the robustness of our results, we compare our dataset to independent satellite and in-situ data. We find that our dataset is well correlated with independent satellite data at monthly time scales and agrees with in-situ observed variability at seasonal to interannual time scales. Our geostrophic velocity fields can resolve the variability of boundary currents wider than about 50 km. We further discuss the seasonal cycle of sea surface height and geostrophic velocity in the context of previous literature. Large scale features emerge: a wintertime Arctic-wide maximum in sea surface height, with the highest amplitude over the shelves, and basin wide seasonal acceleration of Arctic slope currents in winter. We suggest that this dataset can be used to study not only the large scale variability of sea surface height and circulation but also the regionally confined boundary currents.

Francesca Doglioni et al.

Status: open (until 06 Jun 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2022-111', Anonymous Referee #1, 10 May 2022 reply

Francesca Doglioni et al.

Francesca Doglioni et al.

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Short summary
This paper presents a new satellite-derived gridded dataset, including 10 years of sea surface height and geostrophic velocity at monthly resolution, over the Arctic ice-covered and ice-free regions, up to 88° N. We assess the dataset by comparison to independent satellite and mooring data. Results correlate well with independent satellite data at monthly timescales, and the geostrophic velocity fields can resolve seasonal to interannual variability of boundary currents wider than about 50 km.