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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-76
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-76
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: data description paper 27 Apr 2020

Submitted as: data description paper | 27 Apr 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

The Aerosol Characterization from Polarimeter and Lidar (ACEPOL) airborne field campaign

Kirk Knobelspiesse1, Henrique M. J. Barbosa2, Christine Bradley3, Carol Bruegge3, Brian Cairns4, Gao Chen5, Jacek Chowdhary4,6, Anthony Cook5, Antonio Di Noia7, Bastiaan van Diedenhoven4,6, David J. Diner3, Richard Ferrare5, Guangliang Fu8, Meng Gao1,9, Michael Garay3, Johnathan Hair5, David Harper5, Gerard van Harten3, Otto Hasekamp8, Mark Helmlinger3, Chris Hostetler5, Olga Kalashnikova3, Andrew Kupchock1, Karla Longo De Freitas1, Hal Maring10, J. Vanderlei Martins11, Brent McBride11, Matthew McGill11, Ken Norlin12, Anin Puthukkudy11, Brian Rheingans3, Jeroen Rietjens8, Felix C. Seidel3, Arlindo da Silva1, Martijn Smit8, Snorre Stamnes5, Qian Tan13, Sebastian Val3, Andrzej Wasilewski4, Feng Xu14, Xiaoguang Xu11, and John Yorks1 Kirk Knobelspiesse et al.
  • 1NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
  • 2University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 3Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  • 4NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, USA
  • 5NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA
  • 6Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
  • 7University of Leicester, Leicestershire, UK
  • 8SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • 9Science Systems and Applications, Inc.,Greenbelt, MD, USA
  • 10NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, USA
  • 11University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA
  • 12NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, USA
  • 13NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, USA
  • 14University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA

Abstract. In the fall of 2017, an airborne field campaign was conducted from the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California to advance the remote sensing of aerosols and clouds with Multi-angle Polarimeters (MAP) and Lidars. The Aerosol Characterization from Polarimeter and Lidar (ACEPOL) campaign was jointly sponsored by NASA and the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON). Six instruments were deployed on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft. Four were MAPs: the Airborne Hyper Angular Rainbow Polarimeter (AirHARP), the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), the Airborne Spectrometer for Planetary EXploration (SPEX Airborne) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The remainder were Lidars, including the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the High Spectral Resolution Lidar 2 (HSRL2). The southern California base of ACEPOL enabled observation of a wide variety of scene types, including urban, desert, forest, coastal ocean and agricultural areas, with clear, cloudy, polluted and pristine atmospheric conditions. Flights were performed in coordination with satellite overpasses and ground based observations, including the Groundbased Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI), sun photometers, and a surface reflectance spectrometer. ACEPOL is a resource for remote sensing communities as they prepare for the next generation of spaceborne MAP and lidar missions. Data are appropriate for algorithm development and testing, instrument intercomparison, and investigations of active and passive instrument data fusion. They are freely available to the public, at https://doi.org/10.5067/SUBORBITAL/ACEPOL2017/DATA001 (ACEPOL Science Team, 2017). This paper describes ACEPOL for potential data users, and also provides an outline of requirements for future field missions with similar objectives.

Kirk Knobelspiesse et al.

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Kirk Knobelspiesse et al.

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Short summary
The Aerosol Characterization from Polarimeter and Lidar (ACEPOL) field campaign is a resource for the next generation of spaceborne multi-angle polarimeter (MAP) and lidar missions. Conducted in the fall of 2017 from the Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California, four MAP instruments and two lidars were flown on the high altitude ER-2 aircraft over a variety of scene types and ground assets. Data are freely available to the public and useful for algorithm development and testing.
The Aerosol Characterization from Polarimeter and Lidar (ACEPOL) field campaign is a resource...
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