Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-365
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-365

  14 Dec 2020

14 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

A Review of MIS 5e Sea-level Proxies around Japan

Evan Tam1,2 and Yusuke Yokoyama1,2,3,4,5 Evan Tam and Yusuke Yokoyama
  • 1Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo. 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8564, Japan
  • 2Graduate Program on Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo. 3-81 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8902, Japan
  • 3Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo. 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan
  • 4Biogeochemistry Program, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka-city, Kanagawa, 237-0061, Japan
  • 5Research School of Physics, The Australian National University. Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Abstract. Sea-level proxies for Marine Isotopic Stage 5e (MIS 5e, ca. 124 ka) are abundant along the Japanese shoreline, and have been documented for over at least the last 60 years. The bulk of these sea-level proxies are identified in Japan as marine terraces, often correlated by stratigraphic relationships to identified tephra layers, or other chronologically interpreted strata. Use of stratigraphic correlation in conjunction with other techniques such as paleontological analysis, tectonic uplift rates, tephra (volcanic ash), Uranium-Thorium (U/Th), Carbon-14 (14C), and Optically Stimulated Luminesce (OSL) dating techniques have connected Japan’s landforms to global patterns of sea-level change. This paper reviews over 60 years of publications containing sea-level proxies correlated to forming during MIS 5e in Japan. Data collected for this review have been added to the World Atlas of Last Interglacial Shorelines (WALIS), following their standardizations on the elements necessary to analyze paleo sea-levels. This paper reviewed over 70 studies, assembling data points for 300+ locations and examining related papers denoting sea-level indicators for MIS 5e. The database compiled for this review review (Tam and Yokoyama, 2020) is available at: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4294326 .

Evan Tam and Yusuke Yokoyama

 
Status: open (until 08 Feb 2021)
Status: open (until 08 Feb 2021)
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Evan Tam and Yusuke Yokoyama

Evan Tam and Yusuke Yokoyama

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Short summary
Changes in sea-level during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e are comparable to modern sea-levels in our global climate. Contributing to the World Atlas of Last Interglacial Shorelines (WALIS) database, this paper reviewed data from 70+ studies detailing sea-level markers for MIS 5e around Japan. Most sea-level markers were found as marine terraces and are often dated by comparison to dated volcanic ash or sediment layers, which has connected Japan's landforms to global patterns of sea-level change.