Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-337
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-337

  07 Dec 2020

07 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

CDIAC-FF: Global and National CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Combustion and Cement Manufacture: 1751-2017

Dennis Gilfillan1,2 and Gregg Marland1,2 Dennis Gilfillan and Gregg Marland
  • 1Research Institute for Environment, Energy, and Economics, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina
  • 2Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina

Abstract. Global and national scale inventories of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are important tools as countries grapple with the need to reduce emissions to minimize the magnitude of changes in the global climate system. The longest time series dataset on global and national CO2 emissions, with consistency over all countries and all years since 1751, has long been the dataset generated by the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC), formerly housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The CDIAC dataset estimates emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and cement manufacture, by fuel type, using the United Nations energy statistics and global cement production data from the United States Geological Survey. Recently, the maintenance of the CDIAC dataset has been transferred to Appalachian State University, and the dataset is now identified as CDIAC-FF. This paper describes the annual update of the time series of emissions with estimates through 2017; there is typically a 2 to 3 year time lag in the processing of the two primary datasets used for the estimation of CO2 emissions. We provide details on two changes to the approach to calculating CO2 emissions that have been implemented in the transition from CDIAC to CDAIC-FF: refinement in the treatment of changes in stocks at the global level, and changes in the procedure to calculate CO2 emissions from cement manufacture. We compare CDIAC-FF's estimates of CO2 emissions with other global and national datasets, and illustrate the trends in emissions (1990–2015) using a decomposition analysis of the Kaya Identity. The decompositions for the top 10 emitting countries show that, although similarities exist, countries have unique factors driving their patterns of emissions, suggesting the need for diverse strategies to mitigate carbon emissions to meditate anthropogenic climate change. The data for this particular version of CDIAC-FF is available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4281271 (Gilfillan et al. 2020).

Dennis Gilfillan and Gregg Marland

 
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2021)
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2021)
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Dennis Gilfillan and Gregg Marland

Dennis Gilfillan and Gregg Marland

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