Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-333
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-333

  07 Dec 2020

07 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

University of Colorado and Black Swift Technologies RPAS-based measurements of the lower atmosphere during LAPSE-RATE

Gijs de Boer1,2, Cory Dixon3,a, Steven Borenstein3, Dale A. Lawrence3, Jack Elston4, Daniel Hesselius5, Maciej Stachura4, Roger Laurence III3,b, Sara Swenson3, Christopher M. Choate3, Abhiram Doddi3, Aiden Sesnic3, Katherine Glasheen3, Zakariya Laouar3, Flora Quinby3, Eric Frew3, and Brian M. Argrow3 Gijs de Boer et al.
  • 1Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 2Physical Sciences Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 3Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 4Black Swift Technologies, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 5Office of Integrity, Safety, and Compliance, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • acurrently at: Geotech Environmental Equipment, Denver, Colorado, USA
  • bcurrently at: Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, USA

Abstract. Between 14 and 20 July 2018, small remotely-piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) were deployed to the San Luis Valley of Colorado (USA) together with a variety of surface-based remote and in-situ sensors, and radiosonde systems as part of the Lower Atmospheric Profiling Studies at Elevation – a Remotely-piloted Aircraft Team Experiment (LAPSE-RATE). The observations from LAPSE-RATE were aimed at improving our understanding of boundary layer structure, cloud and aerosol properties and surface-atmosphere exchange, and provide detailed information to support model evaluation and improvement work. The current manuscript describes the observations obtained using four different types of RPAS deployed by the University of Colorado Boulder and Black Swift Technologies. These included the DataHawk2, the Talon and the TTwistor (U. of Colorado) and the S1 (Black Swift Technologies). Together, these aircraft collected over 30 hours of data throughout the northern half of the San Luis Valley, sampling altitudes between the surface and 914 m AGL. Data from these platforms are publicly available through the Zenodo archive, and are co-located with other LAPSE-RATE data as part of the Zenodo LAPSE-RATE community (https://zenodo.org/communities/lapse-rate/). The primary DOIs for these datasets are https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3891620 (DataHawk2, de Boer et al., 2020a), https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4096451 (Talon, de Boer et al., 2020b), https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4110626 (TTWISTOR, de Boer et al., 2020c), and https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3861831 (S1, Elston and Stachura, 2020).

Gijs de Boer et al.

 
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2021)
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2021)
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Gijs de Boer et al.

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Short summary
This paper describes data collected by uncrewed aircraft operated by the University of Colorado Boulder and Black Swift Technologies during the Lower Atmospheric Profiling Studies at Elevation - A Remotely-piloted Aircraft Team Experiment (LAPSE-RATE) field campaign. This effort was conducted in the San Luis Valley of Colorado in July 2018, and included intensive observing of the atmospheric boundary layer. This manuscript describes data collected by four aircraft operated by these entities.