Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-324
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-324

  22 Jan 2021

22 Jan 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

Slope deformation, reservoir variation and meteorological data at the Khoko landslide, Enguri hydroelectric basin (Georgia), during 2016–2019

Alessandro Tibaldi1, Federico Pasquaré Mariotto2, Paolo Oppizzi3, Fabio Luca Bonali1, Nino Tsereteli4, Levan Mebonia5, and Johni Chania5 Alessandro Tibaldi et al.
  • 1Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milan Bicocca, 20129 Milan, Italy
  • 2Department of Human and Innovation Sciences, Insubria University, Como, Italy
  • 3Geolog.ch, Mendrisio, Switzerland
  • 4Institute of Geophysics, University of Tbilisi, Tbilisi, Georgia
  • 5Enguresi LtD Society, Georgia

Abstract. The Greater Caucasus mountain belt is characterized by deep valleys, steep slopes and frequent seismic activity, the combination of which results in major landslide hazard. Along the eastern side of the Enguri water reservoir lies the active Khoko landside, whose head scarp zone affects the important Jvari-Khaishi-Mestia road, one of the few connections with the interior of the Greater Caucasus. Here, we present a database of measurement time series taken over a period of 4 years (2016–2019) that enable to compare slope deformation with meteorological factors and man-induced perturbations owing to variations in the water level of the reservoir. The monitoring system we used is composed of two digital extensometers, placed within two artificial trenches excavated across the landslide head scarp. The stations are equipped also with internal and near ground surface thermometers. The data set is integrated by daily measurements of rainfall and lake level. The monitoring system was set up in the framework of a NATO-funded project, aimed at assessing different types of geohazards affecting the Enguri artificial reservoir and the related hydroelectrical plant. Our results indicate that the Khoko landslide displacements appear to be controlled by variations in hydraulic load, in turn induced by lake level oscillations, with a delay of months between lake infilling and extension rate increase. Rainfall and temperature variations do not seem to affect slope deformations. The full databases are freely available online at DOI: https://doi.org/10.20366/unimib/unidata/SI384-1.1 (Tibaldi et al., 2020).

Alessandro Tibaldi et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on essd-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #1, 01 Feb 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Alessandro Tibaldi, 24 Feb 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on essd-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #2, 19 Feb 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Alessandro Tibaldi, 25 Feb 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on essd-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #3, 24 Feb 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC3', Alessandro Tibaldi, 24 Feb 2021
  • RC4: 'Comment on essd-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #4, 26 Feb 2021
    • AC4: 'Reply on RC4', Alessandro Tibaldi, 27 Feb 2021

Alessandro Tibaldi et al.

Alessandro Tibaldi et al.

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Short summary
Under a NATO project, we installed a monitoring system at the Khoko landslide facing the Enguri artificial reservoir (Greater Caucasus). During 2016–2019, we compare slope deformation with meteorological factors and variations in the water level of the reservoir. Our results indicate that the landslide displacements appear to be controlled by variations in hydraulic load, in turn induced by lake level oscillations, with a delay of months between lake infilling and extension rate increase.