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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-276
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-276
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  28 Oct 2020

28 Oct 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

The winter 2019 air pollution (PM2.5) measurement campaign in Christchurch, New Zealand

Ethan R. Dale1, Stefanie Kremser1, Jordis S. Tradowsky1, Greg E. Bodeker1, Leroy J. Bird1, Gustavo Olivares2, Guy Coulson2, Elizabeth Somervell2, Woodrow Pattinson, Jonathan Barte3, Jan-Niklas Schmidt4, Nariefa Abrahim5, Adrian J. McDonald6, and Peter Kuma6 Ethan R. Dale et al.
  • 1Bodeker Scientific, 42 Russell Street, Bridge Hill, Alexandra 9320, New Zealand
  • 2National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), 41 Market Place, Auckland Central 1010, Auckland, New Zealand
  • 3Météo-France, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31100 Toulouse, France
  • 4Luisental 28, 28359 Bremen, Germany
  • 5University of Otago, 362 Leith Street, North Dunedin, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
  • 6University of Canterbury, 20 Kirkwood Avenue, Upper Riccarton, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
  • Deceased 15 March 2020

Abstract. MAPM (Mapping Air Pollution eMissions) is a project whose goal is to develop a method to infer particulate matter (PM) emissions maps from in situ PM concentration measurements. In support of MAPM, a winter field campaign was conducted in New Zealand in 2019 (June to September) to obtain the measurements required to test and validate the MAPM methodology. Two different types of instruments measuring PM were deployed: ES-642 remote dust monitors (17 instruments) and Outdoor Dust Information Nodes (ODINs; 50 instruments). The measurement campaign was bracketed by two intercomparisons where all instruments were co-located, with a permanently installed Tapered Element Oscillating Membrane (TEOM) instrument, to determine any instrument biases. Changes in biases between the pre- and post-campaign intercomparisons were used to determine instrument drift over the campaign period. Once deployed, each ES-642 was co-located with an ODIN. In addition to the PM measurements, meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, wind speed and wind direction) were measured at three automatic weather station (AWS) sites established as part of the campaign, with additional data being sourced from 27 further AWSs operated by other agencies. Vertical profile measurements were made in two intensive radiosonde sub-campaigns and were supplemented with measurements made with a mini micropulse lidar and ceilometer. Here we present the data collected during the campaign and discuss the correction of the measurements made by various PM instruments. We find that for while for the ODINs a correction based on environmental conditions is beneficial, this results in over-fitting and increased uncertainties when applied to the measurements obtained using the more sophisticated ES-642s. We also compare PM2.5 and PM10 measured by ODINs which, in some cases, allows us to identify PM from natural and anthropogenic sources. The PM data collected during the campaign are publicly available from https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4023402 (Dale et. al., 2020b), the data from other instruments are available from https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4021685 (Dale et. al., 2020a).

Ethan R. Dale et al.

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Ethan R. Dale et al.

Data sets

MAPM Campaign Data Ethan Dale, Stefanie Kremser, Jordis Tradowsky, Greg Bodeker, Jonathan Barte, Jan-Niklas Schmidt, Nariefa Abrahim, Adrian McDonald, and Peter Kuma https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4021685

MAPM Campaign PM Data Ethan Dale, Stefanie Kremser, Jordis Tradowsky, Greg Bodeker, Leroy Bird, Gustavo Olivares, Guy Coulson, Elizabeth Somervell, Woodrow Pattinson, Jonathan Barte, and Jan-Niklas Schmidt https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4023402

Ethan R. Dale et al.

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Short summary
MAPM is a project whose goal is to develop a method to infer particulate matter (PM) emissions maps from PM concentration measurements. In support of MAPM, we conducted a winter field campaign in New Zealand. In addition to two types of instruments measuring PM, an array of other meteorological sensors were deployed, measuring temperature and wind speed, as well as probing the vertical structure of the lower atmosphere. In this article, we present the measurements taken during this campaign.
MAPM is a project whose goal is to develop a method to infer particulate matter (PM) emissions...
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