Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-254
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-254

  26 Nov 2020

26 Nov 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ESSD.

Rosalia: an experimental research site to study hydrological processes in a forest catchment

Josef Fürst1, Hans Peter Nachtnebel1, Josef Gasch2, Reinhard Nolz3, Michael Paul Stockinger3, Christine Stumpp3, and Karsten Schulz1 Josef Fürst et al.
  • 1Institute for Hydrology and Water Management (HyWa), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Vienna, Austria
  • 2Forest Demonstration Centre, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Vienna, Austria
  • 3Institute for Soil Physics and Rural Water Management (SoPhy), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Vienna, Austria

Abstract. Experimental watersheds have a long tradition as research sites in hydrology and have been used as far back as the late 19th and early 20th century. The University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU) has been operating the experimental research forest site called Rosalia with an area of 950 ha since 1875 to support and facilitate research and education. Recently, BOKU researchers from various disciplines extended the Rosalia instrumentation towards a full ecological-hydrological experimental watershed. The overall objective is to implement a multi-scale, multi-disciplinary observation system that facilitates the study of water, energy and solute transport processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. This article describes the characteristics of the site, the recently installed monitoring network and its instrumentation, as well as the datasets. The network includes 4 discharge gauging stations, 7 rain-gauges, together with observation of air and water temperature, relative humidity and conductivity. In four profiles, soil water content and temperature are recorded in different depths. In 2019, additionally a program to collect isotopic data in precipitation and discharge was started. On one site, also Nitrate, TOC and turbidity are monitored. All data collected since 2015, including in total 56 high resolution time series data (10 min sampling interval), are provided to the scientific community on a publicly accessible repository. The datasets are available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3997141 (Fürst et al., 2020).

Josef Fürst et al.

 
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Josef Fürst et al.

Data sets

Rosalia: an experimental research site to study hydrological processes in a forest catchment - data repository Josef Fürst, Hans Peter Nachtnebel, Josef Gasch, Reinhard Nolz, Michael Paul Stockinger, Christine Stumpp, and Karsten Schulz https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3997141

Josef Fürst et al.

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Short summary
Rosalia is a 950 ha forested research watershed in eastern Austria to study water, energy and solute transport processes. The paper describes site, monitoring network and instrumentation, as well as the datasets: High resolution (10 min interval) time series, starting 2015, of 4 discharge gauging stations, 7 rain-gauges, together with observation of air and water temperature, relative humidity and conductivity, as well as soil water content and temperature in different depths at 4 profiles.