Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-233
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-233

  13 Oct 2020

13 Oct 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ESSD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Seabed video and still images from the northern Weddell Sea and the western flanks of the Powell Basin

Autun Purser1, Simon Dreutter1, Huw Griffiths2, Laura Hehemann1, Kerstin Jerosch1, Axel Nordhausen3, Dieter Piepenburg1,4, Claudio Richter1, Henning Schröder1, and Boris Dorschel1 Autun Purser et al.
  • 1Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Am Handelshafen 12, 26570 Bremerhaven, Germany
  • 2British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 OET, UK
  • 3Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359, Bremen, Germany
  • 4Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at the University of Oldenburg (HIFMB), Carl-von-Ossietzky-Str. 9–11, 26129 Oldenburg, Germany

Abstract. Research vessels equipped with fibreoptic and copper cored coaxial cables support the live onboard inspection of high-bandwidth marine data in real-time. This allows towed still image and video sleds to be equipped with latest generation higher resolution digital camera systems and additional sensors. During RV Polarstern expedition PS118 in February–April 2019, the recently developed Ocean Floor Observation and Bathymetry System (OFOBS) of the Alfred Wegener Institute was used to collect still and video image data from the seafloor at a total of 11 ice covered locations in the northern Weddell Sea and Powell Basin. Still images of 26 megapixel resolution and HD quality video data were recorded throughout each deployment. In addition to downward facing video and still image cameras, OFOBS also mounted sidescan and forward-facing acoustic systems, which facilitated safe deployment in areas of high topographic complexity, such as above the steep flanks of the Powell Basin and the rapidly shallowing, iceberg scoured Nachtigaller Shoal. To localise collected data, the OFOBS system was equipped with a POSIDONIA transponder for Ultra Short Baseline triangulation of OFOBS positions. All images are available from: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.911904 (Purser et al., 2020).

Autun Purser et al.

 
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Autun Purser et al.

Data sets

Ocean Floor Observation and Bathymetry System (OFOBS): A new Towed Camera/Sonar System for Deep-Sea Habitat Surveys A. Purser, Y. Marcon, S. Dreutter, U. Hoge, B. Sablotny, L. Hehemann, J. Lemburg, B. Dorschel, H. Biebow, and A. Boetius: https://doi.org/10.1109/JOE.2018.2794095

Autun Purser et al.

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Short summary
This data set comprises 26 megapixel seafloor Images collected from below ice and steeply sloped regions of the Southern Ocean (the western Weddell Sea, the Powell Basin and the rapidly shallowing, iceberg scoured Nachtigaller Shoal). These data were collected with the Ocean Floor Observation and Bathymetry System (OFOBS), an advanced towed camera platform incorporating various sonar devices to aid in hazard avoidance and seafloor mapping, allowing use in challenging, high relief seafloor Areas.